Wednesday, August 02, 2006

The Friendly Face of Business Software

Easy to use business software...

"Last fall, AMR Research analyst Bruce Richardson was sitting on a couch in San Francisco's Moscone Center during one of Salesforce.com's many customer conferences thinking about the phenomenon the software company had become. As a scrappy upstart, it took the industry by storm, offering a cheaper and easier to install program to manage sales teams.

Dancing in Richardson's head was a conversation he just had with the chief information officer of a large industrial company who was planning to ditch Salesforce.com's (CRM) software for one of the market leaders, Oracle (ORCL) or SAP (SAP). But when he ran into a chatty conference attendee from the same company, he asked her about the CIO's plans. "Over my dead body," she exclaimed. It was fierce loyalty unlike anything Richardson had encountered in his 26 years covering business software. In fact, it was downright Apple-esque, he says (see BW, 9/19/05, "An eBay for Business Software").

Such fierce user loyalty may be the first spoils in a growing design renaissance in business software. The feature wars are over. The new software upstarts have a powerful one-two punch: cheap startup costs and drop-dead ease of use. While much of the attention in the software industry has focused on inexpensive applications that undercut pricey traditional business programs, it's the new design movement that could prove more important. In fact, it could end up reshaping the user experience across Corporate America.

THE GEEK FACTOR. Forget what the corporate IT department thinks about business software. The actual users will tell you programs like those offered by Salesforce.com may be the first truly intuitive pieces of business software they've ever used. "My mom could pick this up in about three or four minutes," says Chris Corcoran, CEO of Sunset Companies. He's a customer of NetSuite, another on-demand company that's getting ready for an Initial Public Offering this year (see BW, 2/13/06, "Giving the Boss the Big Picture"). "Most salespeople will tell you to take their right arm before you take away Salesforce.com," jokes Kim Niederman, senior vice-president of worldwide sales for Polycom, a Salesforce customer."   (Continued via BusinessWeek)               [Usability Resources]

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