Thursday, June 28, 2007

It Seemed Like The Thing To Do At The Time

A series of stories about overcoming failure by Joe Lamantia on BoxesAndArrows ...

"This is Part One of our Lessons From Failure Series.

“Failure is instructive. The person who really thinks learns quite as much from his failures as from his successes.” JOHN DEWEY

Several years ago, I changed careers, moving from designer to entrepreneur starting a dot com company. The experience taught me many lessons in the basics of how–and how not–to successfully build an Internet business. But the most valuable lesson I learned–one applicable to any business model, design challenge, technology, or industry–was in the powerful links connecting state of mind, self-definition, and failure. Startlingly, these same links appear no matter what size the group of people or the venture: from design projects and startup teams, to cultures seeding colonies abroad, state of mind and self definition are closely connected to how well a group responds to failure.

In the midst of the exuberant rush to (re)create communities on the Internet for a dizzying array of peoples and purposes, we should understand and respect this underlying pattern, whatever our role: founder, designer, or member. For though the growing wave of technosocial media may change how we conceive of and relate to the Internet by offering abundant opportunities to create and join new societies, these societies will remain driven by fundamental elements of state of mind and self definition.

To illustrate these ideas, I’ll briefly discuss three examples of new societies–the entrepreneurial ventures of their respective cultures–that faced failure: first, the small Internet company I founded, then two cultures facing environmental challenges. Two of these societies failed, and one succeeded.

It Seemed Like the Thing To Do at the Time

In the winter of 1999, I decided to start a business with two partners. I was working as an Internet strategy and design consultant at the time, so moving from designing online businesses for clients to designing one for myself felt like a natural step. We had a talented group of founders with the right mix of experience, and we had a good idea. We needed money in order to build substantial business and technology infrastructure, but capital for a good idea was easy to obtain in early 2000. Becoming an entrepreneur genuinely seemed like the thing to do at the time, since it offered a good opportunity to apply my skills and experience at a new level, and to my own vision.

We worked diligently to build the company for the next twelve months. Our team grew from 3 people to 10 people in the U.S. and China. We recruited a (bad) CEO. We recruited a (good) CTO. We assembled an impressive roster of critical business partners and advisors on both continents. We were fortunate–given the terrible business climate for online companies after the dot com crash–to receive several funding offers from the very beginning. But none of them were sufficient, and some were downright shady (I met a number of “unusual” people during this time)."    (Continued via Boxes and Arrows)    [Usability Resources]

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