Thursday, July 19, 2007

Practical Plans for Accessible Architectures

UN guidelines for accessibility ...

"The United Nations recently commissioned the world’s first global audit on web accessibility. The study evaluated 100 websites from 20 different countries across five sectors of industry (media, finance, travel, politics, and retail). Only three sites passed basic accessibility checkpoints outlined in the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 1.0), and not a single site passed all checkpoints.

These guidelines are well established and were first advocated by the W3C in 1999. They simplify the knowledge required to produce accessible code and content. Despite developments in assistive technologies and web content, these guidelines are still invaluable today. They provide developers and editors with a foundation for creating accessible design, which is essential to people who have different access requirements. A second version of the WCAG is now available as a public working draft (WCAG 2.0). Nevertheless, a challenge remains in determining which members of the design team are responsible for accessibility. As more people are involved in the design, development, and editorial process, there needs to be agreement on how to best design for content management and customization, while also allowing for greater accessibility.

Accessible design requires a deeper understanding of context. It’s about providing alternative routes to information, whether that route is a different sense (seeing or hearing), a different mode, (using a tab key or a mouse), or a different journey (using an A to Z site index instead of main navigation). However, accessibility is much easier to achieve when the right foundations are put in place as prerequisites during site planning and strategy.

Approaches to Designing for Accessibility

Labeling and controlled vocabularies

Controlled vocabularies can have a positive impact on accessibility by supporting the development of contextually relevant navigation and consistent, understandable labeling. The WCAG 1.0, Guideline 13 in particular, is written to ensure that navigation is meaningful to people who process information in different ways.

A person using a screen reader can call up a link summary for a given page or tab through links to obtain a general gist of the site. These browsing methods requires web developers to create navigation link descriptions that can be understood without reference to surrounding page context. For example, the purpose of a link should be clear. A user should not have to rely upon nearby visual elements or textual content to understand its meaning."    (Continued via Boxes and Arrows)    [Usability Resources]

Link Summary - Usability, User Interface Design

Link Summary

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