Wednesday, August 29, 2007

Does Web 2.0 make Copy and Content less Important?

The role of the writer in Web 2.0 ...

"Web 2.0" covers a lot of different areas, where site visitors get to contribute and/or interact on the site.

The content on some sites, like Flickr, LinkedIn and YouTube, is pretty much 100% user-generated. The site owners simply have to provide a framework and some instructions. Family sites like Kinzin use copy to sell and describe their service, but the bulk of the content is user-generated, and it is deliberately private. And, of course, forums, blogs, lists and the like have always been "Web 2.0."

(When you think about it, Web 2.0 has been with us from the beginning. The only difference now is that more and more companies are waking up to the benefits of interacting with their site visitors. And more and more tools and widgets are being created to facilitate that interaction.)

SO WHAT'S THE BIG OPPORTUNITY?
The opportunity is not simply to provide widgets that enable your site visitors to add comments and opinions or upload their own content.

The real opportunity is to engage your site visitors in a way that makes them feel part of your site community, and makes then want to come back time and time again.

When you open the doors and invite your readers to contribute, you're saying. "Hey, this can be your place too. Take part and come back often."

IF YOUR USERS GENERATE CONTENT, WHAT'S THE ROLE OF THE PROFESSIONAL WEB WRITER?
Is an online copywriter or Web writer any longer relevant for a site that generates a lot of its content through user contributions?

I think so. In fact, the job of the Web writer becomes even more challenging."    (Continued via Usability News)    [Usability Resources]

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