Sunday, August 12, 2007

Embracing the Un-Science of Qualitative Research Part Three - Improvising is Excellent

Continuation of qualitative usability testing ...

"So, recently we’ve been talking about Qualitative Research and how it’s not so scientific, but that ain’t bad.

We identified three ways that you *might* make Qualitative Research more scientific and have been pulling those approaches apart. They are to:

1. Use a relatively large sample size (which we destroyed here)
2. Ensure that your test environment doesn’t change (which was shown to be foolish here)
3. Ensure that your test approach doesn’t change (which we’ll take down now).

So, one of the first things you learn when you come to qualitative research, particularly usability testing, is to write a test script. A test script is good because you’ll be spending an hour or so with each person and you need to have something to prompt you to make sure you cover what you need to cover, and to help ensure you have a good structure to your session.

But this is how scripts are supposed to be used - as a guide. You shouldn’t literally use them as a script! And you should feel confident and comfortable deviating from the script at the right times.

When are the right times to deviate from the script? I think there are two key times.

If you already know what the answer to your question will be, there is very little reason to ask it. Sometimes it is helpful to have an array of people responding in the same way to the same task or question - particularly if your client is particularly attached to a bad idea for some reason. Repetition can help bring them around. Most of the time, though, you’re just wasting valuable research time covering old ground when you could be covering new.

Very often it’s not until the first one or two research sessions that some very obvious issues become very obvious. You wonder why you didn’t pick them up before, but that’s why we do this kind of testing/research. If you’re not updating your prototype (as recommended in Part Two), then you should update your script. Don’t cover old ground for no good reason, research time is too valuable for that."    (Continued via disambiguity)    [Usability Resources]

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