Saturday, May 10, 2008

BayCHI Monthly Program

Tuesday, May 20, 2008: Monthly Program (BayCHI) ...

"7:30-9:30 pm
Information Visualization for Insight and Communication (Co-Sponsored with Stanford Symbolic Systems)
Ben Shneiderman, University of Maryland HCI Lab

Information Visualization for Insight and Communication (Co-Sponsored with Stanford Symbolic Systems)
Ben Shneiderman, University of Maryland HCI Lab

The rise of interactive information visualization tools provides researchers and analysts with remarkable capabilities to support discovery and communication. They begin with an overview, zoom in on areas of interest, filter out unwanted items, and then click for details-on-demand. The growing commercial success stories such as Spotfire, SmartMoney's Map of the Market, and The Hive Group are only the start. Research prototypes for large time series data are being applied to financial, medical, and genomic data. At the same time, data sharing web sites such as ManyEyes or Swivel and journalistic triumphs, such as the excellent interactive presentations of the New York Times, are helping to promote widespread interactive visual literacy.

This is the first of four lectures in the Stanford Symbolic Systems Distinguished Speaker series, with more lectures on May 21, 22, and 23.

Ben Shneiderman is a professor in the Department of Computer Science, founding director (1983-2000) of the Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory, and member of the Institute for Advanced Computer Studies at the University of Maryland at College Park.

He is a fellow of the ACM and received the ACM CHI Lifetime Achievement Award in 2001. His comprehensive text Designing the User Interface: Strategies for Effective Human-Computer Interaction (Addison-Wesley) came out in its 4th edition in April 2004 with Catherine Plaisant as co-author.

Since 1991, his major focus has been information visualization, beginning with his dynamic queries and starfield display research that led to the development of Spotfire. Dr. Shneiderman developed the treemap concept in 1991 which continues to inspire research and commercial implementations. The University of Maryland’s Treemap 4.0, developed in cooperation with Catherine Plaisant, has been licensed by the HiveGroup and remains available for educational and research purposes. Later information visualization work includes the LifeLines project for exploring a patient history, and its successor project, PatternFinder, which enables search across electronic medical records. Searching for patterns in numerical time series data was enabled by three versions of TimeSearcher, which was applied for stock market, auction, genomic, weather, and other data."    (Continued via BayCHI)    [Usability Resources]

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