Saturday, September 13, 2008

Information Architecture for Audio: Doing It Right

IA approach to audio ...

"Content today is increasingly delivered by audio both online and in the real world. We have radio shows and newscasts, and in recent years, podcasts, audio books and navigation/car assistance systems have been added to the field. Audio is more emotional, as sound effects and acoustic atmosphere enhance content to help deliver its messages. It also affords users the opportunity to interact with content while their hands and eyes are busy (i.e. when doing physical work, driving, walking, etc).

However, the inclusion of audio often results in usability issues that make it difficult for users to access and understand content. That is why we need new tools to organize linear content like audio. Luckily, a wide range of techniques employed in information architecture, journalism, usability engineering and interface design are available. All that’s required is the knowledge to combine them effectively. This article presents a practical framework for designing and implementing audio-based content, such as podcasts.

When using audio today, we face challenges similar to those of written text about a decade ago. During this time, information was being transferred from hand-held documents to the computer screen, without being optimized for the new online medium. Now the same mistakes are being repeated with audio. Existing text is read by a narrator, or worse, the text is speech-synthesized by a computer. Audio doesn’t function the same way as written text, so its execution is often poor. The main difference between printed text, be it on paper or on the computer screen, is that audio is linear. You can only consume it in a linear fashion and you have to listen to it at a given speed.

For example, Figure 1 shows part of the famous Web Trend Map by Information Architects Japan. It’s an excellent example of how information can be displayed in a two-dimensional space. It’s not possible to use one-dimensional spoken text in the same way. When accessing audio, users have no idea how long the segment will last, unless this information is provided by the interface or the narrator states it at the beginning of the segment. Users only have a vague idea of where they are within the narration. If you don’t have any visual hints it’s difficult to determine how much time is left and what topics are going to be discussed. Finding specific content by rewinding or forwarding is difficult. In contrast, finding the next subsection within a text document is very simple. You can easily find a particular word on a page by scanning it or by using your browser’s find function."    (Continued via Boxes and Arrows, Jens Jacobsen)    [Usability Resources]

Figure 1: Part of the “Web Trend Map by Information Architects, Japan - Usability, User Interface Design

Figure 1: Part of the “Web Trend Map by Information Architects, Japan

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